Negotiating a Get Rich Slow Scheme


by Dave Miller

The easiest way to get rich quick is to accumulate wealth slowly. Well then, how does one accumulate wealth slowly?

First you need a plan. A solid, well thought-out, practically applicable plan.

This requires a solid plan, to preserve your precious capital, as you do not want to go backward. The retaining of capital is a key element of moving toward your goal. If you lose your initial capital you must not only gain it back but also recoup the lost time.

It must be well thought-out; you do not want to be jumping on some quick get rich band wagon that is ready to go bust.

The plan must be feasible. Over the ages three areas have proven successful; real estate, gold, and businesses. Most wealthy people own one of these three.

Don’t put all your eggs in one basket, just like your Daddy told you. But nevertheless get some baskets and fill them with eggs. Many people use that line to delay saving and investing.

The real estate basket is the topic of discussion today.

Enter John Schaub and his book Building Wealth One House at a Time.

Building Wealth One House at a Time – John Schaub

This book focuses on strategies for creating wealth through real estate by starting small – and making the right moves. Nationally known real estate expert and speaker, John Schaub, learned his craft in the best way possible–on the job, and through every kind of market. He published a great book titled Building your Wealth one House at a Time. In it he shows you how to buy homes with little money down using private or owner financing. By doing this he eliminates the whims of the banking world. The lender he says, is more concerned about getting his money back than earning high interest. In Chapter 6 he tells you to do what it takes to make the lender happy, over secure if you must.

Click this link to read an article I also wrote on keeping the your lender happy.

He recommends only single family dwellings, no fancy shmancy highfalutin projects. Just solid homes the typical family desires and can afford to live in.

The part that hit home for me was that he says buy one home a year. No more. He warns of the dangers of diving headfirst. By waiting a year to purchase your second investment property you will learn innumerable lessons before plunging in.

John uses two people to accumulate wealth; his renters and his lender or investor. His lenders allow him to buy the home and the renters pay for it. In the meantime he is accumulating wealth. Renting to long-term tenants, with financial incentives to pay on time.

By using leverage, i.e. owner financing, investors or the bank, he can purchase a home that otherwise he would have needed to walk away from. This then allows him to have a renter paying down on the mortgage. But remember, leverage is a two-edged sword. It can help you accumulate faster and it can take you down even faster. You must carefully consider the amount of leverage you are comfortable with and what makes sense in your situation.

Building Your Wealth One House at a Time is very concise yet an easy to read book. It lays out a blueprint that is easy to follow using graphs and figures.

Unique is his approach to focusing on buying houses in good-quality neighborhoods while simultaneously creating positive cash flow properties. John uses the Goldilocks theory when choosing a neighborhood: not too expensive and not too cheap. Go with a neighborhood where prices are just right.

Buy his book today. Read it. Implement a plan. Take the first (I know this is the hardest one but do it anyway) step. You will not get rich quickly but you will most definitely be headed in the right direction.

Now for the good news! John Schaub is coming to town. Well, rather to a town in New Jersey. Iselin.

John is presenting a one day class called “negotiating secrets of a Professional Buyer”. Saturday June 23 2012 from 9:00 to 4:00pm. You can register here: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/3199047437 I plan on being there so I hope see a few of you there. If anyone is interested in carpooling from Lancaster County just call me. Cell number 717-656-0749. Currently four of us are heading there. Join us.

A quote from John’s site:

John has survived, prospered, and helped his students to make money in every market since 1975. Come learn how to recognize which opportunities are right for you today and for the next five years at this most interesting time in our history. Get ready for an exciting and profitable future!

You can subscribe to my blog on the right side bar for farther updates. If you do so, you will receive a copy of my blog as soon as I post it thus saving you time by not needing to check back.

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End of Year Checklist. (Business owners only)


by Dave Miller

The end of 2011 is fast approaching. Yet there are so many things to finish before the year fades. As a business person I make goals to accomplish, whether mentally or actually writing them down, then December arrives and I think of the things not yet done. I take a good hard look at a few things around this time of the year.

These are things that need to be done in this calendar year or they lose value or importance by next year. I raise questions like how will my tax return look next year and what can I do to improve my situation if I do something this year yet?

E Adrian Van Zelfden wrote an excellent article that every business owner should review it this year yet. Click here.

Here are some of the highlights on the list (for me anyway).

  • How to handle year-end, Christmas bonuses or gifts
  • Year end deposits, purchases and paychecks
  • Business meal expenses and travel expenses
  • Inventory
  • Bookkeeping tricks and traps
  • Credit card statements
  • Insurance

The list is thorough but not exhaustive. Print it. Read it. Add your own items.

December 31 2011 will be here in two weeks. Get done what needs doing before then.

Here is the link again.

Published in: on December 17, 2011 at 11:55 am  Leave a Comment  
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My Barter List. You Want to Trade?


by Dave Miller

Here is my barter list. It lists the items and services I am offering then it lists the items I want. If it’s not on the list just ask, barters are usually flexible. By creating this list I have already saved myself 450 out-of-my-pocket dollars.

Craigslist offers a barter column to post items for barter.

Items Offered                     

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  • Kayak, Dagger Element 112 with accessories      Very good condition.        (Value $600)

Life Vest

Paddle

Skirt

Fishing Gear

Helmet

Around $1000 invested

Used 10 to 12 times

  • Business Consulting

Business Coaching

Marketing Strategies

Consulting

Bottom-line Improvement

Advertisement Writing (Ad copy)

  • DVD player (value $35)
  • Wind Turbine (24 volt) New $2700, trade or cash $1200
  • 23’’ TV (Value $75)
  • 12’’ DeWalt sliding double compound meter saw (Value $425)
  • Goose decoys ($25)
  • Lawn Boy 4.5 hp lawn mower (works great) ($150)
  • 3G iPhone with brand new screen (value $180)
  • 60+ wooden shipping pallets ($2. Each)
  • GPS (dash mount) paid $299.

Items Wanted

  • Exterior of Barn to be painted, mostly block.
  • ·         5 Maple trees to be trimmed
  • Taxi services
  • Make new flower garden
  • Fence in play area around child’s swing set
  • iPad
  • Patio dining set
  • Outdoor Kitchen to be built
  • Firearms
  • Gold and silver

It’s time to make a list if you want to save some cash. Make it, post it, save cash.

Related posts: Does Barter Work? How I made it pay better than cash.

Published in: on July 29, 2011 at 7:51 am  Leave a Comment  
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Does Barter Work? How I Made it Pay Better Than Cash


by Dave Miller

Two large maple trees loom over our house gracing our front yard. Sadly the one seems to have some disease and is dying. If we need to remove it, it would leave a gaping hole. It’s tough to think about removing a beautiful tree like this, planted by my father 43 years ago. It’s so large and graceful.

So I called in a tree doctor to analyze and diagnosis. His prognosis was that there is a 25% chance of saving it. That’s not what I wanted to hear.

He tells me they can trim the tree to maximize its chances. Looking at this tree and our 4 other maple trees in need of trimming, he proposes the cost to be $1900. Even though I really like my trees, that’s a lot of money.

So I called “Mr. Mow It All”. Yeah, that’s his company name. Two young men, clean cut and buff, survey the task. They leave a proposal for $1200 with my wife. We are heading in the right direction but I still cringe at parting with $1200.

My wife says it’s barter time.

To barter is to exchange goods or services directly without money or another medium of exchange.

When Sage from Mr. Mow It All calls me, he is professional yet eager for the work. We talk about the barter option. He wants to grow his business so we discuss ways I could help him by working as a consultant. Sage was reluctant to barter all his services for strictly my services. I can’t say I blame him. So we negotiate – 50% cash and 50% consulting in exchange for tree trimming.

My goal, which I think is attainable, is to provide him a service that will far exceed the cash value. To pay him in a way that continues to return profits for years to come. Sage made a remark that is true in bartering, he said “I feel like you are trying to give me something in return rather than just getting me to work for less”. That comment is the essence of bartering. Both parties get more.

A few months back Matt from J M Lapp, LLC asked me to do some consulting and writing for him. He was attempting to get his Master Plumber license in Lancaster City, a tough job. So we bartered my writing and consulting skills for his plumbing skills. We put together a presentation for the board, asking them to waive the apprentice requirement and allow Matt to take the test.

A few months later I received a phone call from a proud jubilant Matt proclaiming his success. He is a Master Plumber. He didn’t even need to take the test.

After he got his master plumber license I was working on a project in Lancaster City. The property manager’s plumber was not available. I asked if he is looking for another plumber. He said he is that it’s always good to have options. So I recommended Matt to the largest property manager in Lancaster City. I hope they partner in the years to come.

In barter cases both parties feel as if they received more. If your client feels as if he received more than he bargained for, he will more likely refer new clients to you.

Put together a barter list to help you negotiate when the time is right. List items or services you have available. This will assist you when the opportunity arises.

 

I recommend the skills and knowledge of these people:

Mr. Mow It All 717-598-9478, Tree Service, Lawn Care, Landscaping, Trash Removal, Snow Removal.

J M Lapp LLC 717-405-5718, Plumbing and drain cleaning, Heating and air conditioning, Water softeners and water treatment systems

 

 

Published in: on July 5, 2011 at 6:25 am  Comments (1)  
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Stupid Excuses to Avoid Action – Building My Master Plan, Part Two


by Dave Miller

Work sucks. Don’t tell me what to do me. I’m Lazy. These are a few of the excuses I unconsciously use to negate my desires to improve. I know plans are important, they work, and I’m a better person through them, yet I find excuses.

As I think through my Master Plan (for part one click here) I realize I want the result, but not the work. Classic ambivalence. Why is this? What is going on inside?

Many times the desire to plan is squashed by opposing emotions. Summarized here are a few emotions that love obliterating a plan.

  • Disciplinary fears – The love to be wild and free. Uninhibited. We want to be our own man. By making a plan we feel as if our spirit would be tamed with a schedule. Little do we look at the exuberance created by having a well thought out goal in mind.
  • Work sucks – We are stuck in a dead-end job. The desire to excel is lacking when you’re in a job you don’t really enjoy.
  • Nothing is easier to do than something – Since The Fall we are looking for the easy way out. The snooze button allows us to push-off the inevitable a little longer. One must work against one’s sinful nature to overcome the sin of laziness.
  • Feelings – We don’t feel like it. Today’s society wants to base life on how they feel. Everyone is focusing on “How do I feel about that.” If I lived on feelings I would not have gotten out of bed this morning.
  • Inadequate plan – Planning is good but I must also conquer the over-planning syndrome. Action is the key.

A task list helps you triumph over these emotions that are hindering you. Goals help you to know why the tasks on your to-do list exist. Dreams are in a sense goals without a plan.

“Take time to deliberate; but when the time for action arrives, stop thinking and go in.” – Napoleon Bonaparte

The key is to find the proper balance between planning, preparing and action. In too many cases the emphasis is placed on the planning and preparing stages while forgoing the action. Michael Masterson summarized it well from his book “Ready, Fire, Aim”.

The idea, in a nutshell, is this:

  • Action is the most important thing. Careers and projects are killed much more often by the reluctance to act than by acting too soon.
  • Still, some planning and preparation is helpful.
  • Get it roughly right as soon as you can, and then start. You can work out the kinks later.

  Thus, Ready, Fire, Aim.

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.” – Theodore Roosevelt

The Transition – Building My Master Plan, Part one


by Dave Miller

I sit in the woods in Huntington County, reflecting on the past, enjoying the solitude of the woods.

I think back, pondering. Contemplating a transition. Visualizing and planning for the more future-oriented me.

In the past two months, I have spent almost all my time and energy on the rebuilding of my business after it was destroyed by a fire. Endlessly I worked to get the shop back in production. Doing whatever was needed at the moment. Bending to the tyranny of the urgent. Even though it was imperative that I do so, you can only survive in this atmosphere. A change of thinking must take place or insanity will set in.

My accountant, Mike Stoltzfus said you may allow this to happen. The rushing about in urgency. But it must also stop. “It’s okay to act like this for a while, but set a date for when it will end,” he said.

I took his advice seriously because he knows how to make things come to fruition. He is a real example of what one can do if he pushes himself to the brink. He took 5 years of college in 2 ½ years while working full-time as an accountant. Does the word discipline come to mind? A plan, perhaps? He didn’t accomplish that running on emotion.

One reason to stop the spinning of wheels is for sanity preservation. The other is to gain traction and initiate moving forward. Not only forward but procuring the right direction.

With the help of 5 friends that meet regularly I am putting together a master plan for the next seven years of my life. We are studying The Pledge by Michael Masterson and building from his structure.

The book covers four areas around which to formulate your plan.

  • Health
  • Wealth
  • Self Improvement
  • Social Happiness

The key is to have enduring ambition while maintaining balance.

This plan is not something to take lightly. So, I will spend the next few months building and refining, sorting out the differences between dreams and goals.

Goals are attainable while dreams are not. This makes me remain honest as I keep the realism in place.

Here is a list of values present in goals but absent in dreams

  • Goals are attainable
  • They have a timeline
  • You can break them into action steps
  • They are specific

Start by thinking about the future and who you want to be. How do you want to be perceived by your friends, family, neighbors and peers? Think about it.

Now that you have given it some thought, do they see you in the light you want to be seen in? If not, are you heading in the right direction?

Think about your goals. Write them down. Even if it’s not some master plan. Write down a few things you would like to accomplish today.

Action is the key. (Another article on this next week)

 

Related Posts:

“You’ve got to be very careful if you don’t know where you’re going, because you might not get there.” Yogi Berra

Real Mistakes by Real Investors, and How You Can Avoid Them (Part One)


by Dave Miller

In the real estate world investors tend to make the same mistakes over and over again. Then after a time they learn and either stop investing or stop making the mistakes. When they stop making the mistakes yet continue to invest, then the dividends start coming in.

Yet new investors emerge into the market place making the same mistakes their predecessors did.

You have a choice; to make the mistakes yourself or to learn from other people. I say, learn from other people’s experiences. It’s cheaper than way.

#1. Ignoring Risk Management

   Investments consist of two sides; risk vs. reward. Yet many tend to skip the risk element. Buying and hoping for the best. “Hoping for the best” is not risk management. You must carefully weigh the risk-to-reward ratio. All investments have risk, there is no such thing as a risk-free investment. Even if the risk is only your time or your money being tied up. You therefore risk your time or money on this project while it could be used on another possibly better deal, losing chance of a greater return.

  Loss of capital can come in various forms; capital loss (devaluation), loss of greater gains, loss of additional capital (lawsuits),i.e.

Here are few ways to reduce risks:

  • Purchase your property in a LLC
  • Discuss the purchase with a trusted attorney
  • Know the market
  • Get liability insurance

This list could be ten pages long, yet I will stop with this. Encircle yourself with trusted and experienced advisors. Ask questions. Weigh your options. Call or email with questions, call 717-951-0201 or realstreet@frontiernet.net , I will gladly give you a free 15 minute consultation. (Consider the risk first, losing 15 minutes vs. gaining 15 minutes of knowledge)

#2. Over Leveraging

Investors love the way leverage increases the return on the investment. Yet they forget it is a two-edged sword. Leverage magnifies both profits and losses. Investors tend to use too much leverage and use it too long in their careers.

Am I advocating no leverage? No.

Investors should use leverage early in their careers, making sure they can cover the payments with alternative means, and move towards more secure loan-to-value ratios later in their career, making the net worth they achieved more secure.

#3. Picking the Wrong Strategy

Pick a strategy that matches your strengths. Not everyone is cut out to raise the rent on eighty-five year old ladies or evict 6’ 5’’ drug thugs. If you don’t know how to fix a roof and are scared of heights then stay off the roof.

Aligning your strengths with your strategy requires honesty. Rather than focusing on how someone else did it, look at yourself and your potential. If you are not a sales person but rather Mr. Fixer-upper then outsource the sales aspect and focus on fixing.

#4. Overstating Returns

Hunters and fishermen tend to exaggerate, telling tales that captivate their wide-eyed audience. Real estate investors tell even wilder tales. Telling friends they made $5,000 on a wholesale deal yet forgetting to mention they spent $12,000 on some guru telling them how.

Whether working with partners that hold an equity position or private money investors, you need to gain their trust. For this deal and for the next. If you overstate the returns and then fall short of your promises you risk losing a partner. But if you honestly and accurately state your expected returns and then supersede them, you win.

#5.Overimproving Properties

There is no profit in fixing something. The profit is in the added value of the improvement. If it costs you $5,000 to build a garage that increases the property value by $5,000, you have not added value. Make sure the improvement adds value beyond the cost.

The profit is in the purchase price. Not in the improvements. Improvements cost money, paying less does not.

Many investors pay too much for fixer-uppers. Don’t be one of them. Make your money on the buy.

Avoid trying to squeeze every penny out of the deal when you can close the deal with a decent profit. A certain dollar today is better than an unsure dollar tomorrow. Here is an example of a property I could have made more money on but chose not to (Click Here). Get the fast buck not the last buck.

#6. Waiting Till April 15th to Check If You Turned a Profit

April 15th is when you report your profits to the IRS, not when you see if you had a profit. In real estate numbers are everything. If you lost money on a deal you need to know that NOW! Not after three more deals like it. Run the numbers. Have your accountant involved in your planning.

Quotable Quote:

There’s blind luck, dumb luck and then there’s get up every morning at 5:30 and sweat the details luck. Few people actually stumble into wealth. It takes persistence, tenacity and a tireless work ethic. In the end, luck has little to do with success. It takes experience and hard work. Pure and simple. –  Smith Barney

Working or Networking, It’s Your Choice


by Dave Miller

Is networking worth your time? I made $5000 last week with my network. I’ve done it before and I’ll do it again.

I continue to be highly impressed with the power of networking. In many ways networking is more than just looking out for my best interest. It means reaching out to other people.  If they have needs you can help them with, then do so. You will create a relationship.

Networking is more than a list of people. It is people with whom you have a mutually beneficial relationship. Other business people, potential clients and/or customers. The better your relationship with these people, the stronger your network.

Everyone has a network. It is simply the people you know. Everyone one from your nearest and dearest to your neighbors’ plumber’s cousin who surely has a phone number you could track down if you cared to.

Not everyone puts a cognitive effort into building their network. This is a mistake.

Here is a list of ways to build a bigger better network.

Start an email list

Begin building an email list of people you know have interest in your product or service. For me this has been a huge eye-opener and success.

I send out an email when I have an investment opportunity to share. This results in about a dozen or more emails a year. I do not bombard my network, only the stuff that matters get sent out.

To be added to my email list just click here

Add tag lines to your emails and correspondences

Last fall I added the words, “Financial and Real Estate Solutions” to my email. The first email I sent to my email network resulted in a call from a fellow asking if I do hard money loans. I do. I set him up. He made over six thousand and I made over twenty-eight hundred in two weeks’ time. Needless to say we were both happy, all from a mere tag line.

Social networks

Facebook, LinkedIn, et al. Any way to let people know what you are doing. Telling them every juicy nugget of gossip fodder about your personal life is not necessary.  But by filling them in on your business dealings you will be amazed by how many people you know have similar interests.

Help  others

Step out and help people. By helping others you will blessed. Okay, here is the plug: My brother has a house in Bird-In-Hand he is trying to sell. I told him I would get him some exposure by mentioning it here.

Quaint and Quiet

It is a quaint 3 bedroom rancher with a horse barn. It is an ideal starter home or investment property. Here is the link. He is asking $149,000 and the previous renter paid $940 a month. It has the potential to get $1000 rent per month. This is an excellent John Schaub style home. You can call Allen directly at 717-295-0662. If you find Allen a buyer I’ll see that you pocket $500

Start a blog.

Every marketing guru says so, so I will too. Start a blog.

Newsletter

Write a newsletter. Keep your network informed. This could be your blog.

Referrals

People know people. If you are in the market to buy a rental property, then call people. Ask. Call your real estate attorney and tell him what you are looking for and ask him if he knows anybody that could help you. Call your banker. Call your investor friends. If you are selling, ask for referrals. Tell your people you will reward them if they give you a successful referral. Note the $500 reward mentioned above.

Quotable Quote: The secret of my success is a two word answer: Know people.– Harvey S. Firestone

Get Rich Slow Scheme


by Dave Miller

The easiest way to get rich quick is to accumulate wealth slowly. Well then, how does one accumulate wealth slowly?

First you need a plan. A solid, well thought-out, practically applicable plan.

This plan must be solid, to preserve your precious capital, as you do not want to go backward. The retaining of capital is a key element of moving toward your goal. If you lose your initial capital you must not only gain it back but also recoup the lost time.

It must be well thought-out; you do not want to be jumping on some quick get rich band wagon that is ready to go bust.

The plan must be feasible. Over the ages three areas have proven successful; real estate, gold, and businesses. Most wealthy people own one of these three.

Don’t put all your eggs in one basket, just like your Daddy told you. But nevertheless get some baskets and fill them with eggs. Many people use that line to delay saving and investing. Procrastination kills.

The real estate basket is the topic of discussion today.

Enter John Schaub and his book Building Wealth One House at a Time.

John Schaub

Building Wealth One House at a Time - John Schaub

This book focuses on strategies for creating wealth through real estate by starting small – and making the right moves. Nationally known real estate expert and speaker, John Schaub, learned his craft in the best way possible–on the job, and through every kind of market. He published a great book titled Building your Wealth one House at a Time. In it he shows you how to buy homes with little money down using private or owner financing. By doing this he eliminates the whims of the banking world. The lender he says, is more concerned about getting his money back than earning high interest. In Chapter 6 he tells you to do what it takes to make the lender happy, over secure if you must.

Click this link to read an article I also wrote on keeping the your lender happy.

He recommends only single family dwellings, no fancy shmancy highfalutin projects. Just solid homes the typical family desires and can afford to live in.

The part that hit home for me was that he says buy one home a year. No more. He warns of the dangers of diving headfirst. By waiting a year to purchase your second investment property you will learn innumerable lessons before plunging in.

John uses two people to accumulate wealth; his renters and his lender or investor. His lenders allow him to purchase the home and the renters pay for it. In the meantime he is accumulating wealth. Renting to long-term tenants, with financial incentives to pay on time.

By using leverage, i.e. owner financing, investors or the bank, he can purchase a home that otherwise he would have needed to walk away from. This then allows him to have a renter paying down on the mortgage. But remember, leverage is a two-edged sword. It can help you accumulate faster and it can take you down even faster. You must carefully consider the amount of leverage you are comfortable with and what makes sense in your situation.

Building Your Wealth One House at a Time is very concise yet an easy to read book. It lays out a blueprint that is easy to follow using graphs and figures.

Unique is his approach to focusing on buying houses in good-quality neighborhoods while simultaneously creating positive cash flow properties. John uses the Goldilocks theory when choosing a neighborhood: not too expensive and not too cheap. Go with a neighborhood where prices are just right.

Buy his book today. Read it. Implement a plan. Take the first (I know this is the hardest one but do it anyway) step. You will not get rich quickly but you will most definitely be headed in the right direction.

Quotable Quote: It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed. – Theodore Roosevelt

Top 10 keyboard shortcuts to help improve efficiency


Are you spending too much time moving your cursor, pointing and clicking just to accomplish simple tasks on your PC? Did you know that you can use your keyboard to work more efficiently?

Below is a list of 10 keyboard shortcuts that will help you increase your productivity by eliminating the need to reach for the mouse.

 

  •  CTRL + C will copy text after it has been highlighted.
  • CTRL + V will paste text that you have copied.
  • CRTL + Z will undo any change that you have done.
  • CTRL + ESC will bring up the Start Menu.
  • SHIFT + F3 will turn all capitalized text into lowercase.
  • SHIFT + DELETE will delete an item immediately without placing it in the Recycle Bin.
  • ALT + TAB will bring up a Window with a list of icons representing programs which are currently running on your computer. While holding the ALT key, press and depress the TAB button to cycle between each icon task.
  • ALT + ESC will switch to the next task running on your computer. Hold down the ALT before pressing and depressing the ESC key to cycle to the next task.
  • CTRL + ALT + DELETE will bring up Task Manager and allow you to end a process (terminate a program) if it has crashed or has stopped responding. Select the process which has stopped responding, and then press “END PROCESS”.
  • SHIFT + INSERT will paste any text that is in your clipboard.
    Your cursor must also be placed in an area that will accept keyboard input for this to work.

 

When I come across an article like this I like to print it out and keep it close by when typing. My goal is to implement one of these shortcuts. I know I will not learn all of them so I focus on one or two in hopes of making one come as second nature.

Published in: on June 19, 2010 at 10:15 am  Comments (2)  
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