We Need More Christian Billionaires


by Dave Miller

  “We need more Christian billionaires, let’s be Christian billionaires.” my friend said. At first I brushed the comment off without any farther thought. But a day later the comment was still ringing in my head. Was there more to that line than I was giving it credit for? Was there a deeper truth I was ignoring?

  I started asking additional questions. How would society benefit by having more Christian billionaires? How many exist?

  The more I looked at it I realized once again it was not the money that made the man. The wisdom and experience would outweigh the money. In order for a person to gain that amount of financial savvy he must immerse himself in knowledge and good judgments. 

  What are deeper ways to benefit society?

  • Philanthropic efforts – This is first thing that most people think of. Even though I think it’s deeper than that, this is still a way to impact people. As always it is risky, because finding avenues that contribute to society in a healthy way is tough. So often money or food is given to poor people and it encourages that society to expect a handout. Nevertheless with a little research good missions can be found.
  • Political clout – People with money have influence. In 1776 this was the case and our foundation was built. Just as the left does damage with its money to expand its agenda, so can a Christian.
  • Betterment to society with experience – We are better off if we can learn from experience, our own or others. Who better to learn from than a Christian? A person with the fortitude to make a billion dollars could contribute to society in incalculable ways.
  • Jobs that have a healthy atmosphere – The work place has a huge impact on people’s lives. If that area can have a Christian vibe to it then it will filter into their personal lives.
  • Wealth building through job creation through efficiency – Better work ethics, which I think Christians (especially of Protestant descent, create better efficiency which equals more competitive prices. This means more business coming your way, and then you hire more employees creating more jobs, thus equaling more wealth. Wealth building is more than having a job, its learning to do a good job.
  • R&D – Research on solar, wind, gas, ethanol or other energy, should not be subsidized by the government. When a private enterprise does the R&D it is usually viable. And if it’s viable, well, then it’s worth doing. If the government gets involved they attempt to create a market in areas that are not viable. They subsidize it and this puts supply and demand out of balance. A mess is created. Again, ethanol is a prime example. Let the private enterprises do the R&D.
  • Educational advancement – When people have money, they like to put it to use in a way that satisfies their worldview. Education is an example on this. A lot of money has been spent on education in the last 150 years. The worldview of these advancements has devastated our educational system. By having money and a good worldview this decline could be reversed.

  Far greater than having a Christian with a billion dollars is the influence and contribution he can make to society. The means of getting there, the knowledge retained, and the intellectual value far outweigh the money in the end.

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Stupid Excuses to Avoid Action – Building My Master Plan, Part Two


by Dave Miller

Work sucks. Don’t tell me what to do me. I’m Lazy. These are a few of the excuses I unconsciously use to negate my desires to improve. I know plans are important, they work, and I’m a better person through them, yet I find excuses.

As I think through my Master Plan (for part one click here) I realize I want the result, but not the work. Classic ambivalence. Why is this? What is going on inside?

Many times the desire to plan is squashed by opposing emotions. Summarized here are a few emotions that love obliterating a plan.

  • Disciplinary fears – The love to be wild and free. Uninhibited. We want to be our own man. By making a plan we feel as if our spirit would be tamed with a schedule. Little do we look at the exuberance created by having a well thought out goal in mind.
  • Work sucks – We are stuck in a dead-end job. The desire to excel is lacking when you’re in a job you don’t really enjoy.
  • Nothing is easier to do than something – Since The Fall we are looking for the easy way out. The snooze button allows us to push-off the inevitable a little longer. One must work against one’s sinful nature to overcome the sin of laziness.
  • Feelings – We don’t feel like it. Today’s society wants to base life on how they feel. Everyone is focusing on “How do I feel about that.” If I lived on feelings I would not have gotten out of bed this morning.
  • Inadequate plan – Planning is good but I must also conquer the over-planning syndrome. Action is the key.

A task list helps you triumph over these emotions that are hindering you. Goals help you to know why the tasks on your to-do list exist. Dreams are in a sense goals without a plan.

“Take time to deliberate; but when the time for action arrives, stop thinking and go in.” – Napoleon Bonaparte

The key is to find the proper balance between planning, preparing and action. In too many cases the emphasis is placed on the planning and preparing stages while forgoing the action. Michael Masterson summarized it well from his book “Ready, Fire, Aim”.

The idea, in a nutshell, is this:

  • Action is the most important thing. Careers and projects are killed much more often by the reluctance to act than by acting too soon.
  • Still, some planning and preparation is helpful.
  • Get it roughly right as soon as you can, and then start. You can work out the kinks later.

  Thus, Ready, Fire, Aim.

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.” – Theodore Roosevelt

Good and Bad Run on Parallel Tracks and Usually Arrive About the Same Time


By Dave Miller

Today there is a gigantic sucking sound heard throughout the United States of America.  April 15th, Tax Day.  Massive amounts of money left the hands of honest hard working citizens. It landed in the hands of the federal government, a place we would not regard a worthy investment. We would advise any good friend to avoid buying into a company so dreadfully run. Steer clear. Make extra effort to maneuver around it.

  • The Bad: My hard-earned money funding activities considered corrupt and morally wrong. Behavior a Christian would view as sinful to be funding or directly involved in.
  • The Good: I take a good hard look at my blessings. I reflect, questioning my expenses and activities. Every year I ask the same questions; where did it all go? Did I take for granted the plenty? Did I count my blessings enough? Then I start to recollect expenses that accumulated, good and bad. I adjust and plan for the better. I learn and vow to be a better steward.

Am I advocating not paying taxes? Au contraire.

Rather I view it as both good and bad. The wasted funds are gone but I identified them as such. Now that they are acknowledged I adjust accordingly; a renewed effort to make frugality prevail. Wiser investments will be made. Less money wasted on frivolous consumables. If I had not looked at the bad I would not be considering making improvements for the better.

Do not dilute the bad with the good to smooth things out. Look at evil as evil, and good as good. Nevertheless, I focus on the good to maintain my sanity. Still at all times believing that good will overcome the bad. Focusing on the good doesn’t mean I turn a blind eye to the bad and pretend it absent. It is present. It is bad. View it as bad and the good as good.

Tragedies happen, people get hurt, some die. We see school shootings, molestations, vehicle accidents and the like, as heartrending times. They are. When a heart is rending, it does hurt, it is not a false prognosis. Even casual bystanders’ heartstrings are tugged. The pain is real.

But can we survive if we focus only on the negative elements? Do we believe that only bad comes from these events? If the world is such an awful place then why does good come from these appalling trials? Timelessly we are reminded God has a bigger scope, but still they are just that; appalling, awful and bad.

Then out of the blue we see daffodil sprouts peeking through the barren ground. Moments ago it appeared so bleak, now it is emitting cheer in a desolate time. Soon the entire garden is flaunting its splendor. A rainbow materializes showing a promise of hope.  We stand in awe. Just when we thought there was no hope and all was lost, that barren dirt transformed into a peacock of color. Beautiful it is, yet only eight inches below the delicate flower is soil. Brown dirt; a substance easily changed to mud with a sprinkle of rain or to dust with the lack thereof. But, nevertheless, the flower blooms. The dirt remains, however it is overwhelmed with an array of grandeur. Hope is renewed, bringing forth confidence in God’s paradoxical plan. A rainbow at the end of the tunnel. In believing that the rainbow existed from the start, we can see optimism in the drear, feel love during the ugliness and have faith in the grip of trepidation.

The fact that good came from the bad doesn’t discount the bad. Flowers grew out of the dirt. That doesn’t make the dirt less dirty nor the flowers less beautiful. Good remains good and flowers are still appealing. Dirt is still dirt and evil is evil yet.

Quotable Quote: “Good and bad run on parallel tracks and usually arrive about the same time.” – Dr. Ron Dunn

Published in: on April 15, 2010 at 4:05 am  Comments (1)  
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